Opinions, Photo Gallery

New perspectives are important to our growth as students

One of the more important parts of our college experience is learning how to see things that we’ve seen many times with a different perspective.

The only woman selected for the 1965 California International Sculpture Symposium was Claire Falkenstein, who contributed her work "U as a Set". The sculpture contains over 6,000 lbs. of copper and sets in the currently dry fountain beneath the McIntosh Humanities building.
The only woman selected for the 1965 California International Sculpture Symposium was Claire Falkenstein, who contributed her work "U as a Set". The sculpture contains over 6,000 lbs. of copper and sets in the currently dry fountain beneath the McIntosh Humanities building. Photo credit: Steven Matthews

Perhaps you’ve noticed this occurring with a belief you’ve had. Something happened, then suddenly what you thought you knew gets put into a different perspective and changes how you see it from that point on.

This doesn’t have to be just our thoughts or beliefs.

The catwalks in the main theater in the Theater Arts building is roughly two floors above the stage and stage technicians have to wear harness to keep them safe during work and productions.
The catwalks in the main theater in the Theater Arts building is roughly two floors above the stage and stage technicians have to wear harness to keep them safe during work and productions. Photo credit: Steven Matthews

As we head into the end of the year, it’s a good time to remember that there’s a lot on campus that we’ve walked by so many times and missed.

Take Walter Pyramid for example.

Walter Pyramid as it looks from the top of the escalator outside the ASI building.
The Walter Pyramid shows itself to spectators from the top of the escalator outside the ASI building along with greenery that surrounds the foreground. Photo credit: Steven Matthews

We know it’s there; we know it’s not going anywhere. We count on seeing it in the skyline to the south as we ignore it when we walk within its shadow.

In the smallest of space on the top floor outer staircase of the Hall of Science, you can actually see the tip of Walter Pyramid through the top auditory port of the Carlson/Bloc Tower.
In the smallest of spaces on the top floor outer staircase of the Hall of Science, visitors can see the tip of Walter Pyramid through the top auditory port of the Carlson/Bloc Tower. Photo credit: Steven Matthews

It’s at that time we should seek different perspectives and look at the things we’ve seen so many times as something new.

There's only one spot you can spot the Carlson/Bloc Tower. That's from the northwestern corner of the Palo Verde North parking structure. The tower was sculpted by French artist Andre Bloc and was his last work before he died at age 70.
There's only one spot on lower campus that viewers can spot the Carlson/Bloc Tower. That's from the northwestern corner of the Palo Verde North parking structure. Photo credit: Steven Matthews

The Carlson/Bloc Tower, or the bell tower, is another sculpture we walk by almost every day. Next time you’re nearby, walk over to it and take a look inside.

Even though the bell tower is silent these days, if you look inside you can see the design ideas the sculptor had to give it its unique sound it had when it rang in the past.
Even though the bell tower is silent these days, if students look inside you can see the design ideas the sculptor had, to give it its unique sound when it rang in the past. Photo credit: Steven Matthews

On the south side of the Molecular and Life Sciences building are several balconies that overlook lower campus. Another sculpture, from the same symposium that gave us the bell tower, sits below on the grassy hill.

From ground level, only one part of the sculpture really stands out. However, the perspective you get from the balconies reveals the entire piece.

One of the entries into the 1965 California International Sculpture Symposium is Kosso Eloul&squot;s contribution "Hardfact".
One of the entries into the 1965 California International Sculpture Symposium is Kosso Eloul's contribution "Hardfact". Photo credit: Steven Matthews

Changing our perspective reveals something new.

For sculptures and buildings, it reveals artistic and architectural inspiration, a message from the people who made it to all the students who walk past.

From the top floor of the Psycology building, if you look between the space between the edge of that building, and the faculty offices beyond, you can see students heading toward the Shakarian Student Success Center.
From the top floor of the Psychology building, if viewers look between the space between the edge of that building, and the faculty offices beyond, students can see students heading toward the Shakarian Student Success Center. Photo credit: Steven Matthews

Gaining a new perspective on the things we already believe gives us a better chance at further understanding the landmarks on campus and provides a more complete past for the future to remember.

Down the steps from the bell tower sits Ukrainian artist Piotr Kowalski&squot;s sculpture, "Now". The pieces were formed from steel sheets that had dynamite fixed to them that was detonated underwater.
Down the steps from the bell tower sits Ukrainian artist Piotr Kowalski's sculpture, "Now." The pieces were formed from steel sheets that had dynamite fixed to them that was detonated underwater. Photo credit: Steven Matthews

They’re both important parts of the college experience that shapes us into the well-rounded people we’ll be for the rest of our lives.

Comments are closed.

Newsletter

Daily 49er newsletter